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March 31, 2014

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Lisa Kauffmann

It all looks good on paper but the reality is another movie. Until corruption is curbed, these UPP's will not be able to realize their goal. Too much money is involved with the drug trade for the police to be ethical and clean, the temptation is too high. It is unfortunate for the hard working people of the favelas, who just want to live and work in peace. As for education and health, lots of blah blah blah from the politicians, but no concrete actions. The rhetoric will ramp up as it is an election year, but promises delivered will be closer to zero, as per usual.
Its sad, Brazil is a great country, but the people that run it are just in it for themselves.

paul

It comes down to the brazilian bottom line , which is , in my humble opinion, a lot of rhetoric and smoke and nothing really effective to show as social progress, except maybe an overly large bill for the contributer also known as taxpayer. All of so called social improvement actions are really just cosmetic overtures to fool the mob thinkers and to hang on to the guilty conscious and vote of the established crowd. If you look back on time , say 40 or 50 years the core of the so called social problems were basically the same. All that was done is the never ending cosmetic changes.

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