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February 27, 2012

Comments

Eduardo

Nice! Good to see your impressions on cities other than Rio!

Allan Henke

Ah cara! Até a Gringa quer tirar onda com o sotaque nordestino? Fala sério!

Oh Man! Even Gringa once looked dislike northeast people accent? Could I say her time in Rio made her absorb Rio's prejudice? Is it not already much disrespectful for us to be mocked by Brazilians from other regions? Enough!

Elizabeth Shaler dos Santos

Concordo com Allan. Tal comentario sobre o sotaque pernambuques e a fala me parece muito provinciano e nao tem lugar numa materia sobre o crescimento desta cidade no contexto do desenvolvimento geral do Brasil. Oxe, ta me aperreando!

anonima

Esse renascimento do Norte não está presente em toda região, por exemplo, enquanto Recife cresce e renasce outra cidade tb dessa região, Salvador, não acompanha esse desenvolvimento(a cidade está cada vez mais decadente).
Gringa, ao visitar Pernambuco vc se surpeendeu positivamente,mas se vc visitar aqui(Salvador)vc vai se decepcionar.

ps:eu sou baiana

F.Sousa

Allan, I think you made a misunderstanding here, just seems to me that Rachel struggled to adapt to the accent, and that in the beginning can make understanding very annoying. I had the same feeling for adapt myself to British English, but then I started to love the accent when it became clear to me. The same seems to have happened to her, as can be noted in the addendum that she gives right after this.

I think it was unfair of you to assume such things ignoring the very sight of Rachel against prejudice and culture stereotypes that she usually discusses here.

Rio Gringa

Obrigada F. Sousa. Acho que foi um mal-entendido mesmo, porque o que escrevi foi precisamente o que você falou. A tradução em português seria:

A outra coisa que notei foi o sotaque pernambuco. Ao princípio, achei estranho o som, até um pouco irritante, mas esta vez por alguma razão, me acostumei e ainda comecei a gostar muito.

V.Robadey

I completely agree with you F.Sousa. The struggle to adapt to new sounds might be annoying and sometimes frustrating.

My husband and I have experienced that in different contexts. He learned Portuguese in Salvador (northeast as well) and I must say that he can speak perfect "baianês". However, on a trip to Recife he faced the same difficulties Rachael mentioned. I myself experienced the same situation when we moved back to the States. Since I have learned English in Brazil, I was used to hear non-native speakers more frequently than native ones. It was quite shocking how different American accent sounded to me and it took me some time to get used to.

There's nothing to do with regional favoritism or prejudice. That's a phenomenon that anyone who has learned a foreign language will face: the combination of rhythm and intonation you have been exposed to, and what you will hear in the environment you're going to.

Great article Rachael! Congratulations!

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