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April 11, 2010

Comments

Alexandra

I went half way through the process, gave up, and married in Canada instead, where all I needed was my birth certificate. As luck would have it, I didn't even need a translation since the official knew French and could make out the Portuguese. The marriage in Brazil was only a religious ceremony so that the family could have their party.

Bruno

This is unbelievable. There are a lot of things to be proud about Brazil however bureaucracy is one of the worst things here. I am ashamed of all this bureaucracy.

If you are not brazilian, imagine the same process for everything legal or related to law. It is truly a nightmare.

And the worst thing is: all these steps do not make forgery or cloning or whatever theft harder in any way. They only serve to make the lives of the good citizens miserable here.

mallory elise

thanks for letting me guest post Rachel!

Bruno it was a bit much. the consular officer at the US embassy in sao paulo was pretty amused by the problems the registry office had with the smallest of details like my mom's middle name being "D". i was hysterical when the registry office first rejected the packet of documents because of names, i remember being on the phone with my husband who was at work, and he said "welcome to brazilian bureaucracy" and then i could hear a group of coworkers laughing at the statement. then i realized being upset would not do anything, so i yelled out loud again how brazilian officials are so full of themselves, then i made an appointment to fix the things at the consulate, because there was no way these grumpy faces were going to keep me from getting married.but now there is a problem with my CPF card....it never ends! hehehe.

Vera

I am Brazilian and I easily got married with an Australian in Rio de Janeiro. I didn't have that much trouble at all...

Here are the differences:

1) Send your birth certificate to the Brazilian Consulate General that has jurisdiction over your region/country of residence. The certificate has to be stamped by a Brazilian consular officer before it can be translated into Portuguese.

Never finished with the birth. When your translation is complete, you must submit both the original and translated birth certificate to a city licensing office. Both documents are kept for about a week to be stamped yet again.

MY GOD, WHERE DID YOU GET MARRIED? NO, DIDN'T HAPPEN LIKE THAT AT ALL FOR US. MY HUSBAND ONLY HAD TO TRANSLATE HIS BIRTH CERTIFICATE TO PORTUGUESE WITH A CERTIFIED TRANSLATOR, WE SHOWED THE TRANSLATION AT THE REGISTRY OFFICE AND WE COULD BOOK OUR WEDDING. SIMPLE HUH?

2) Issuing a single certificate in Australia: Simple, go to any Registry of Marriage and request it - ready right away for 7 dollars.

3) Public Translators
CONSIDERING THAT THE WORLD DOESN'T ONLY SPEAK ENGLISH, OF COURSE A TRANSLATOR IS NECESSARY. TO BE ABLE TO STUDY IN AUSTRALIA THE AUSTRALIAN COLLEGE THAT I STUDIED REQUESTED REGISTERED TRANSLATIONS OF MY ACADEMIC BACKGROUND. FOR ME IT SEEMS OBVIOUS OTHERWISE ANYONE CAN SAY THAT THE WORD "MAN" IS THE SAME AS "BETERRABA". I SUPPOSE ANY COUNTRY REQUIRES THAT. ALSO I DON'T KNOW WHAT YOU MEANT BY HAVING A COFFE WITH THE TRANSLATOR, IT SEEMS YOU WANT TO CREATE MORE WORK WHERE IT DOESN'T EXIST... FOR ME, I ONLY HAD TO SCAN THE DOCUMENT, SEND BACK TO THE TRANSLATOR BY EMAIL AND ON THE NEXT DAY THE TRANSLATED AND REGISTERED DOCUMENT WAS DELIVERED IN MY APARTMENT. YES, BRAZIL DOES HAVE THIS.

4) Whether you are having a ceremonial wedding or not, it is necessary (for all Brazilians) to be legally married inside of the registry office as well.
NOT AT ALL, THIS INFORMATION IS 100% WRONG. I DON'T KNOW WHERE DID YOU GET MARRIED BUT IN BRAZIL YOU HAVE THE OPTION TO HAVE A JUSTICE OF PEACE IN YOUR WEDDING (YOU HAVE TO PAY A BIT MORE, WHICH IS FAIR ENOUGH SINCE THIS JUSTICE OF PEACE WILL GO TO YOUR WEDDING VENUE). I GOT MARRIED in 2008 AT MY FATHER'S HOUSE IN A BEAUTIFUL HOUSE IN THE MOUNTAINS. IT IS NOT MANDATORY AT ALL TO GET MARRIED IN A REGISTRY OFFICE.

I could go into more details but I have to go...

mallory elise

WOW! alright Vera, i didn't know you could have the city come to you-- my bad. that's what happens when you only get married once. hehe. but see, it is still done by the same person, the justice of the peace, so whether or not he is doing it in the registry office or in your father's backyard is the same thing! the point in writing that was to show the difference between an american wedding and the brazilian procedure, because as you just said, it is required that all weddings have the judge at some point :) so stop yelling at me, you argued against your own point there in minute detail.

furthermore, vera, i'm sure why you are shouting at me. is that necessary? believe me that i made nothing of it up, my dear. this was the situation in the city where i live, which is a medium size city in sao paulo state. this article is about what i went through. if you want to write about what you went through, i'm sure Rachel would accept! she loves guest posts.

i have no idea about australian single certificates. i'm american--hence the statement of obtaining the single certificate at the American Consulate in Sao Paulo, because in the US we can't get them. but that is lucky for you that you got to skip that step.

sorry to confuse you about the public translator, if you noticed the article is not an ehow.com article, it is somewhat editorial, hence the at times sarcastic interjections. that just happens to be my writing style. make sure you don't visit my blog if it bothers you! it is usually written stream of conscious. You see, i only wrote about having coffee with my translator because she happened (note the word happened in the text) to be visiting the city i live next to at her weekend house. it was a coincidence! and surely wouldn't happen in other situations, just mine. But as a writer, it is a bit more entertaining to provide that information than merely "get a translation" i prefer not to write in the style of a website of a foreign embassy.

about the stamp on the certificate before translation, maybe it has changed in the past 2 years because it is the first item listed on the "required documents" page at the Washington DC Embassy of Brazil in the US. i generally try to follow the procedures outlined by the authorities. so i complied. lucky you if you didn't have to at the time.

so there is no need to scream at me in capital letters. Life is too short to yell at people who mean you no harm! i'm not as tough as Rachel is with unhappy readers as i make few angry with ice cream recipes. but i am not your enemy, i'm your friend. I live in Brazil now with fewer friends than i had when i was five years old, so i need you to be my friend. instead of yelling at my inadequacies, simply stating the differences for getting married in Rio as opposed to Sao Paulo probably would have been most helpful for Rachel's readers who come here for advice on matters just like that.

please don't be bitter, it's stopped raining!

mallory

Vera

Hey Mallory, I didn't mean to scream - I just used capital letters to differentiate the answers from the questions as I was in a hurry. I suppose it was a bad choice of letters! Well... of course it was hehe.

Regarding the coffee with the translator, on the same way you use your writing style, maybe would be a good idea to inform your readers that was only your case as reading your post it seems that everyone needs to have a "close relationship" with the translator to have what they want. That's how it seemed to be. After all, you are not writing a fiction piece... I think there is a fine line between making jokes/having a writing style and making statements of what the reality actually is. Rachel pointed out on the first paragraph that your post was supposed to be about "what it takes for a foreigner to marry in Brazil" so if that was the objective I just wanted to make sure for the readers that you don't need to have "coffees" whatsoever with any translator to have a mere translation.

Also regarding the justice of peace, I thought it was also important to highlight to the readers that you don't need to go to the registry office to get married - and I truly believe that this is a very important piece of information (on the first post it seemed important for you as well as you emphasize it with so much energy - the title was even "The Big Day"). I got your sarcasm on saying that the "city comes to me" but that's not the case. I suppose this blog has a lot of readers so I just wanted to make sure they got the correct information before they gave up on having their dream wedding in Brazil because they read what you wrote. I would be very careful next time to say "for all Brazilians" to anything (as you used on the "Bid Day" topic) because you can't generalize something when you are not 100% sure about it. I would never do it. In my opinion, to be the "most helpful" to the readers we need to make sure we tell all sides of the story - and for me truth comes first while "writing style" comes second - unless I make sure to the readers that it is a fiction piece and/or only my personal story. But it wasn't quite clear on your post.

Don't worry, I am not bitter at all - mind you, I wasn't the one complaining about getting married! (by the way, this last phrase was only a joke, don't take me that seriously! As we say in Brazil, we loose the friend but never the joke). Well actually now after two years married I might have changed my mind about complaining about my marriage... ;-) (joking again!!!)

Cheers

Melissa McCormack

I have a few questions I would like to ask you in private. Do you have MSN, AIM or an email I can reach you? Thanks!

Rick H

Hi im so stressed with this whole process

I need a - Affidavit from two witnesses, relatives or not, attesting to know the parties and attesting that there is no impediment to get married; WHERE CAN I GET A FORM LIKE THIS. does anyone have a templet of this

Andressa Tasso

How did you get the Single Certificate in Brazil? I'm trying to figure out but have been so difficult. I'm about to get married with my fiance, he is American and he is already here in Brazil with me, we need his Single Certificate and I don't know how to get. =/ Can you help me?

pastos

Hi
I am French(he) and my partner in Brazilian (she). We re planning to have a EEA civil partnership in UK because it s where we live since 4years. It should be a straight forward matter because we have all the documents to prove our genuine relationship.
In the next 3 years we re planning to move to Brasil permanently.
My question is:
1)Can I get permanent visa with a UK civil partnership not a marriage?
2)What do I have to do to work full time in Brasil as EEU member and How long does the process takes?

Administration in Brazil is very slow I have been there twice and seen it.

Any useful information are welcome.

Dan

Hi, nice post! I'm interested in the immigration process as I married my (Brazilian) wife in Britain 4 years ago and now we're thinking of moving to Brazil. Do you know if your immigration process is the same for already married couples? How long does it take until you are allowed to work?
Thanks
Dan

Aaron Hughes

Hi, please help if possible.. I am a british citizen and in love with a girl from Maranhao in the N.E of Brazil, I have spent the past six months in brazil but had to leave with the restrictions of a tourist visa...What I need to know PLEASE SOMEBODY, is once you are married, can you immediately begin to work (I heard something about that you could work immediately but not get a Cartao de trabalho)...also...If I enter the country on a tourist visa (90 days + another 90 days at polical federal)...when I am married how long can I stay? Am I restricted?

I am in a situation where I have four possible job offers, who all say they will take me immediately I am legal...
I am so close to getting the life I always wanted, and am so stressed over it all, please help if possible..

Aaron

Mike

I'm going to jump on the specific-question-bandwagon here for a minute. I'm wondering about the day after your wedding. Where do you get this temporary stamp that allows you to stay in the country? Any assistance would be much appreciated.

-Mike

Krystee

Hi! Did you change your last name? I'm American and marrying a Brazilian and while I always imagined I would take my husband's name, I fear it will cause problems because of future documentation. For example, after we get married, I'll have to go to the federal police and apply for residency but my passport will be in my maiden name, while the marriage paperwork will have my 'novo nome', right? I just don't want to cause a hassle for myself but I'd like to take his name. What to do...

Thanks for any help you can offer.

Matt P.

"Did I cry? Only once. A great reminder that it really is all worth it, because a life in Brazil with my best friend is more than worth it. So take a breath, and go. "

I have to admit I got a tear in my eye reading that.. She's very much worth it. I'm just starting this process and I know in the immediate future I'm going to need a lot of help and direction with this daunting process.

Many Thanks: For your helpful and useful Blog...
Wishing you both the very best as well as a very long and happy joyful life together.

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